Mindfulness: A way to calm our mind, relax our body

Mindfulness gives kids a tool for understanding how their brain works, for having better self-control,

Handwork: A way to understand our ability.

A motor skill is a learned sequence of movements that combine to produce a smooth, efficient action in order to master a particular task.

Concentration through Craft work

Crafting is both fun to make and fun to play, at the same time, it helps the younger one to concentrate.

Teamwork: Learn to share and work together.

Functionality of a good culture family and society comes from teamwork.

Drawing is a way of self-understanding

Drawing for kids is an important time to enhance their mind and artistic skills, it shows the way of thinking pattern of a person.

Work with your hand

How flexible is your hand means how flexible is your brain, as your brain control your hands.

Fun work with clay

Working with clay is fun, because a child has to learn how to press, to work the clay into round, square, tear drop or peanut shape.

Concentration: training needed for all age.

When a child being able to be comfortable with silence, they have the ability to concentrate.

Why the learning experience is greater than end results



A friend of mine struggled with tests as a child.  Any time an assessment was coming up, his mind would go blank and he’d panic.  The pressure of passing weighed down on him to such an extent that no manner of revision or study took him any further.

A couple of days before another test, the worry became too much and he asked his Dad for help.  His Dad, is a school teacher.

Dad said, “You don’t need to worry about tests if you always try your best.  There’s more to life than getting full marks.”

The father went on to say that an interest in learning is far more important than focusing on a test result.  If you can honestly tell yourself that you worked with a view toward learning and discovery, the results should follow.  Get 0% or 100%, the mark doesn’t matter if you work hard in the process.  The results will come naturally.

My friend continued his preparation for the test.  This time, the learning was more fun.  He felt less stress and more connection with the learning materials.

On the day of the next test, he turned up at school with a totally different perspective.  There was a sense of peace. Terror didn’t pin him down.  Despite feeling nervous, he was confident.

And (surprise, surprise) he passed without difficulty and with high marks.  This success came about from one small change of focus.  Instead of concentrating on the end result, the focus was on the learning experience as a whole.

My friend has taken his Dad’s advice with him ever since and loved his time at university, while getting solid grades along the way.  He teaches other children now and I hope he’s able to pass on what he discovered to his pupils.

Unfortunately, schools are under so much pressure that many teachers are used to talking at their pupils rather than engaging in active conversation.  This doesn’t allow students to “perform at their optimum”.  At a time when pupils should be encouraged the way my friend was, they’re in real danger of being let down.

An Institute of Education (IoE) study on learning recently found that the advice my friend was given is effective in helping students achieve much better grades than those who are focused on results:

“In one study, some teachers were told to help pupils learn while others were told to concentrate on ensuring that their pupils performed well. The students under pressure to perform well obtained lower grades than those who were encouraged to learn.

“Another study showed that when teachers focused on their students’ learning, the students became more analytical than when the teachers concentrated on their pupils’ exam results.

“A further study, of 4,203 students, showed classroom behaviour improved when teachers focused on learning rather than grades.”
    [Guardian]

At university, you are far more responsible for your own learning.  Luckily, that means you don’t have quite the same pressures with teachers focusing on your grades in the same way.  However, you need to make decisions over what you’re going to focus on.

So what will it be?  Focus on the result, or focus on the learning?  A focus on the learning allows the end result to develop favourably, whereas a focus on the result clouds the process.

Chris Watkins, the author of the IoE report says, “passing tests is not the goal of education, but a by-product of effective learning”.

Perhaps it’s time to give learning a fresh approach.  Involve yourself in the research.  Get interested in the material on offer and actively seek out more information.

post adapted from the university blog

The Boy Who Always Won



There was once a boy who liked nothing more in the world than to win. He loved winning at whatever it may be: football, cards, video games... everything. And because he couldn't stand losing, he had become an expert in all kinds of tricks and cheating. He could play tricks in practically every situation, without being noticed; even in video games or playing alone. He could win without ever being caught.

He won so many times that everyone saw him as the champion. It meant that almost no one wanted to play with him, he was just too far ahead of everyone. One person who did play with him was a poor boy, who was a bit younger. The champion really enjoyed himself at the poor boy's expense, always making the boy look ridiculous.

But the champion ended up getting bored with all this. He needed something more, so he decided to apply for the national video games championship, where he would find some competitors worthy of himself. At the championship he was keen to show his skills but, when he tried using all those tricks and cheats he knew from a thousand different games, well... none of them worked. The competition judges had prevented any of the tricks from working.

He felt terribly embarrassed: he was a good player, but without his cheats, he couldn't beat a single competitor. He was soon eliminated, and sat there, sad and pensive. Finally, they announced the name of the tournament champion. It was the poor boy from home. The one he had always beaten!

Our boy realised that the poor boy had been much cleverer than himself. It hadn't mattered to the poor boy if he lost and got a good beating, because what he was really doing was learning from each of his defeats. And from so much learning he had been transformed into a real master.

From then on, the boy who had loved winning gave up wanting to win all the time. He was quite happy to lose sometimes, because that was when he would learn how to win on the really important occasions.

author: Pedro Pablo Sacristán



Early Morning Mindfulness

Early morning mindful can be carried out over breakfast.

Eat your breakfast consciously, and mindfully. 

You might think that’s easy and that you do it all the time, but do you really?

Like everyone, you’re maybe at your desk, catching up on emails, reading the paper, talking to your partner or kids. You may not even taste what you’re putting in your mouth.

Eating mindfully, with your mind totally on every mouthful, is an art. It needs practice.


① Try to focus entirely on your meal. Chewed, tasted, and swallowed.
② Feel your feet connecting with the earth through my floor.
③ Looked into the bowl, and be thankful that every element in your breakfast had a connection to the Earth. they are grown in the Earth, watered by rain, ripened by sun.
④ Express our gratitude to the farmers who have toiled to harvest it, and the workers who have toiled to pack and deliver it to our local store.

Be thankful always ....

True, Good, Useful .......


Last two weeks my schedule was tightly packed up with activities, and dealing with different kind of people at various age group.

Finally, I have time for myself and I reviewed what have been through, I found out that thinking requires time, to digest what you have learned required time too.

What kind of time your required?  Time to be alone.


In ancient Greece (469 - 399 BC) Socrates was widely lauded for his wisdom. One day the great philosopher came upon an acquaintance who ran up to him excitedly and said

"Socrates, do you know what I just heard about one of your students?"

"Wait a moment," Socrates replied. "Before you tell me I'd like you to pass a little test. It's called the Triple Filter Test."

"Triple filter?"

"That's right," Socrates continued. "Before you talk to me about my student let's take a moment to filter what you're going to say. The first filter is Truth. Have you made absolutely sure that what you are about to tell me is true?"

"No," the man said, "actually I just heard about it and..."

"All right," said Socrates. "So you don't really know if it's true or not. Now let's try the second filter, the filter of Goodness. Is what you are about to tell me about my student something good?"

"No, on the contrary..."

"So," Socrates continued, "you want to tell me something bad about him, even though you're not certain it's true?"

The man shrugged, a little embarrassed.

Socrates continued. "You may still pass the test though, because there is a third filter - the filter of Usefulness. Is what you want to tell me about my student going to be useful to me?"

"No, not really"

"Well," concluded Socrates, "if what you want to tell me is neither true nor Good nor even useful, why tell it to me at all?"

The man was defeated and ashamed.

Socrates taught us to be true, to be good and deliver the useful message. 

For a person to learn the art of mindful communication, just ask yourself before you respond: Is it true, is it kind, and is it necessary?



THE THREE SIEVES


A LITTLE boy one day ran indoors from school and called out eagerly: "Oh, mother, what do you think of Tom Jones? I have just heard that ----"

"Wait a minute, my boy. Have you put what you have heard through the three sieves before you tell it to me?"

"Sieves, mother! What do you mean?"

"Well, the first sieve is called Truth. Is it true?"

"Well, I don't really know, but Bob Brown said that Charlie told him that Tom ----"

"That's very roundabout. What about the second sieve -- Kindness. Is it kind?"

"Kind! No, I can't say it is kind."

"Now the third sieve -- Necessity. Will it go through that? Must you tell this tale?"

"No, mother, I need not repeat it."

"Well, then, my boy, if it is not necessary, not kind, and perhaps not true, let the story die."




Thanks for being with me. Wishing you "Good Day" ~ Aimee

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